Madigan, Rauner both get poor marks from Illinois voters - WEEK.com: Peoria-area News, Weather, Sports

Madigan, Rauner both get poor marks from Illinois voters

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CARBONDALE, Ill. (WEEK) -- -

Neither House Speaker Michael Madigan nor Governor Bruce Rauner are terribly popular among Illinois voters, a new poll shows. 

The Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University said both politicians have low job approval ratings. Gov. Rauner's positive rating is 31 percent, with 63 percent disapproving of his job performance. Speaker Madigan had a 21 percent approval rating, with 68 percent of poll respondents disapproving of the powerful Chicago Democrat. 

President Donald Trump rated more highly with voters than either Illinois politician, with a 36 percent approval rating and 62 percent disapproval rating. 

“It is notable that Governor Rauner’s job approval in Illinois is somewhat more negative than President Trump’s. This is the opposite of the more usual finding of other polls in other states”, said John Jackson of the Paul Simon Institute, one of the directors of the poll. 

The poll also showed the impact of the so-called "Trump effect" on other Republican races in the state. Twenty-seven percent of poll respondents said President Trump's record in office would make them more likely to vote for a Republican for Governor, Lt. Governor, Secretary of State or Attorney General. Fifty-five percent said they would be less likely to do so, and 11 percent said neither. 

Similar numbers were seen for voters casting a ballot for a Republican member of the U.S. Congress or state General Assembly. 

“The Republicans should not expect a boost in Illinois for their congressional and state legislative candidates this year from Trump’s coattails while the Democrats will try to use opposition to Trump’s record as a motivator for a higher turnout for their candidates” said John Shaw, director of the Paul Simon Institute.

The poll was conducted Feb. 19-25 with a statewide sample of 1,001 voters. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percent. 

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