An international, humanitarian crisis hits home in Peoria.

An international, humanitarian crisis hits home in Peoria.

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Students had a chance to learn about the Syrian dilemma firsthand.

Consider this startling statistic: more than four and a half million Syrians have been displaced as the conflict enters its 7th year.

Deadly attacks continue to increase the death toll in Syria. 

Many now are calling this the biggest humanitarian crisis since World War two.
   
"It's unpredictable what's going on in Syria. Everyday there is tragedy, everyday there is an attack," said Roya Naderi with the Karam Foundation. 

Many are fleeing from the war-torn country in search for a safer home. 

But they aren't always welcomed with open arms. 

"Syrians specifically right now are victims of a mulch-facisted war. They are targeted by multiple fronts and it's important to look at them as people who need us not as people to be afraid of," said Naderi.

The Geneva Convention is intended to protect civilians, schools, and those tending to wounded soldiers but  the panelists said, it's failing.

"So everybody that belongs to the terminology of medical field is neutral. We have bombing of schools, we have bombing of shelters, we have bombing of homes. And unfortunately in 2013 when the Assad regime used chemical weapons and killing 1400 people at one time," said Suzanne Akhras Sahloul with the Syrian Community Network.

Suzanne said she gets frustrated with leaders who say Assad has crossed the line,  but then don't do anything.

Both woman who help Syrian refugee's re-build say they hope NATO and other world leaders step in and uphold the law. 

Roughly 60 people attended this forum at Bradley.

Many of the students tonight were getting some helpful insight into the international studies coursework.
     

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